Tag Archives: enterprise voice

Updated Tool: Lync Common Area Phone Management (GUI)

If you haven’t seen it or played with it, there’s a free tool available to you that I’ve developed that will help manage Lync Common Area Phones with a GUI interface.  There is nothing to install, it’s a pure PowerShell script you can run.  Read more about that here if you haven’t seen it: http://www.lyncfix.com/?p=715

What’s new is that it’s been updated again due to a request by a user.

Marcel writes:

“Hi Anthony, thank you for this great tool. It is very helpful doing maintenance on the common area phones.
I have a few questions/suggestions:
– You cannot select multiple cap’s to make changes. For example: I want to assign a new Pin Policy on 100 phones. I have to do it one by one now. Can you make it possible to select multiple phones?
– The company I work for has one the largest and complex installations. When I start this tool I see all (3300+ phones on 100+ pools). Is it possible that you add a feature to select the correct pool?”

Introducing Version 1.2!  These capabilities have now been added.  As you can see in the screenshot below, there is a Filter dropdown that allows you to filter by pool, or all pools.  The ability to select multiple phones and set the pin, make changes, or remove them is now available as well.  If you wanted to grab a selection of phones from pool1 and move them to pool2 with a new voice policy and dial plan, just select the phones on the left, change the relevant dropdowns, and click the “Save Changes” button.  Fields that do not have values selected will not change when the “Save Changes” button is pressed.   This way, you can modify only one or a few settings at a time.

multiselect

If you have any thoughts, comments, bug reports, or feature requests, the Q/A section in the TechNet gallery is the best place, but I’m also watching here as well.

As with any free tool you find on the Internet, use at your own risk!

To download the program, please find it here in the TechNet Gallery: http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/lync/Lync-2013-Common-Area-57bc4ff1

If you like it, please give it 5 stars over at the TechNet Gallery.  If not, please drop me a line before you rate it and give me a chance at fixing whatever bug you may have found.   I might also be able to add a feature you’d like to see!

Thanks again and let me know what you think!

New Tool: Change Lync Conferencing Dial-In Number Display Order (GUI)

I wrote this for the last blog post, Reviewing and Reordering Lync 2013 Dial-In Conferencing Numbers.

Basically, I realized that if you have quite a few numbers to display, swapping the order around can be a pain.  So, I wrote a PowerShell GUI to do all the heavy lifting for you!

From the link to the TechNet Gallery at the bottom:

If you ever have more than a few Lync dial-in conferencing numbers but the order is off, you know it can be a pain to rearrange them.  That’s the whole purpose of this GUI.  It’s a simple PowerShell script that can be run from your Lync server or anywhere the Lync Management Shell is installed.  No parameters to specify, just pick your region in the dropdown box and move your numbers up, down, to the top, and to the bottom.

I have noticed that the change may take a few minutes to take effect and users may need to restart Outlook before the change is seen.  This is a function of Lync, not the script itself.

If you like it, please give me 5 stars!  If you don’t, please let me know why before rating (in the Q/A section, or find me on Twitter or LinkedIn via my TechNet profile).  I can make that bug fix for you, or possibly make the additon you’re looking for depending on complexity.

Before you run any script from the Internet, please back up your data as you agree to run this at your own risk!

DialInGui

Try it here: http://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Change-Lync-Conferencing-0207cb29

Reviewing and Reordering Lync 2013 Dial-In Conferencing Numbers

You’re using Lync 2013, you’ve entered several different conferencing numbers for your region, and now when you go to create a Lync meeting invite the numbers are out of order or just aren’t logically arranged.  How can you change the order?  Well, there’s a setting for that and the trick is of course in PowerShell with the Lync Management Shell.  This can be a bit tricky at first because if you simply run Get-CSDialinConferencingAccessNumber you won’t see the priority list.  Well, there’s a trick to that too, you have to specify the region and also specify that you want to see all parameters as shown below:

Get-CSDialinConferencingAccessNumber -Region “Illinois” | format-list *

get

You’ll see the a priority 0 and a priority 1 entry.  The lowest number is the first to be displayed in the meeting invite.  In our example above, this means that 312 666 1212 is displayed before 312 555 1212, and that CAN NOT HAPPEN!  So, the simple trick to make the change with Set-CSDialinConferencingAccessNumber.  To run this command, you’ll need to specify two settings, the first is the Priority, the second is the ReorderRegion.  In our example, I effectively want to move our 312 555 1212 to the top of the list.  To do this I’d run:

Set-CsDialInConferencingAccessNumber -Identity sip:temp1dialin@domain.com – Priority 0 -ReorderedRegion “Illinois”

Notice here that I set the priority of temp1dialin (which matches the 312 555 1212 number we want to move up) to 0, which is the lowest number.  However, isn’t this number already specified as the priority of the other number?  Not to worry, Lync figures it out and reorders appropriately.

set

If we wanted more granular control, perhaps we have many numbers, we could execute the command repeatedly with priorities starting from 0 and moving higher like so:

Set-CsDialInConferencingAccessNumber -Identity sip:temp1dialin@domain.com -Priority 0 -ReorderedRegion “Illinois”

Set-CsDialInConferencingAccessNumber -Identity sip:temp2dialin@domain.com -Priority 1 -ReorderedRegion “Illinois”

Set-CsDialInConferencingAccessNumber -Identity sip:temp3dialin@domain.com -Priority 2 -ReorderedRegion “Illinois”

That’s pretty much it.  It’s not difficult, but it’s also not something you might just stumble across.  Good luck and if you have any questions, remember the best way to reach me is via LinkedIn or Twitter so find me and ping me there!  Also, stay tuned because in the next post I will reveal a simple GUI that does all of this for you!

 

Using Lync Audio in an RDP Session

Why? Why would you want to use audio for Lync in an RDP session? Well, many reasons, for me I want to make a test call to watch QoS markings to a tiny office without getting on a flight. That being said, it doesn’t necessarily work out of the box. Here’s a tip that will help you.

First, when you connect, make sure that your local resources in the RDP client allow for both audio playback and audio recording as seen in the following screenshot.

RDPAudio

However, you can’t stop here.  By default in Windows 7 and 2008 R2 you’ll find that the remote workstation/server will report that there’s no audio recording device available, even if it plays back sound and you can here it.  That’s because audio recording redirection is disabled by default, and you’ll need a registry hack (or GPO) to get it going.  As seen in this article http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2020918, we need to change the value of  HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server\WinStations\RDP-Tcp\fDisableAudioCapture to 0 (that’s a zero).   Almost immediately, you should be able to record audio, however you might need to bounce the Lync client.

RDPAudio2